Friday, February 24, 2006

People on ludes should not drive

I don't know how many of you have been following this story in LA over the past couple of days, but it seems some Swedish millionaire basically destroyed a Ferrari Enzo while trying to street race it against a Mercedes, which he also owned. The car is one of only 400 that were ever made, and probably goes for somewhere around a million bucks. There are some interesting elements to the story. The owner says he was not driving at the time, and the guy who driving was some German dude that he didn't know who then fled the scene of the accident. The owner escaped with virtually no injuries despite striking a pole while doing something like 120 MPH. Part of the reason, well, probably the main reason, is because the car is designed to more or less cut itself in half in the event of such an accident, with the passenger cabin detaching from the back, which contains the V-12 engine. Car enthusiasts are no doubt weeping over such a waste of what many call not a car, but rather art on wheels. Here are some pictures:






Certainly a sad story if you're a car enthusiast, and it should be interesting to see what develops with this mystery driver. But throughout this whole story, the same thought keeps racing through my head:
Relax, alright? My old man is a television repairman, he's got this ultimate set of tools. I can fix it.

3 comments:

Josh said...

Despite how horrible the car looks now, it's great that it dis what it was supposed to and no one got hurt. I mean, with such a high speed collision and almost no injury, this has GOT to be a great safety selling point for their cars. I now know that if speed limits are eliminated and I want to go 120 MPH, I should get a Ferrari.

J. Michael Neal said...

Hey, how about those Finns? A Ferrari trying to do 120 through their defense would find some guy with too many vowels right with him, preventing the Ferrari from getting the puck.

Seitz said...

It's not so much the vowels as it is all of the kkkkkks and nnnnnnns.